People don't always suck


Since I deal with some deeply depressing news, I decided that I need a happy place to remind me that people can be really amazing sometimes. When I feel dragged down by meanness, selfishness, corruption, and ignorance, this is where I will come. Feel free to submit acts of human kindness, selflessness, and just plain awesomeness.

And if all this awesomeness is too much for you, you can check out my other blog, http://foulmouthedliberty.tumblr.com/, for balance. :)

Ask me anything
unamusedsloth:

[source]

unamusedsloth:

[source]

Source: unamusedsloth

unamusedsloth:

These kids are going places, maybe not college but places…

Source: unamusedsloth

Marilyn Monroe

(June 1, 1926 – August 5, 1962)

“She will go on eternally.”- Jackie Kennedy Onassis

Source: vintagegal

slinkyinky:

come-closer-vasilisa:

allisonkilkenny:

Chilean artist set fire to all evidence of student debt worth £297 million
source

He seriously took one for the team. God bless :*

a hero, holy shit

slinkyinky:

come-closer-vasilisa:

allisonkilkenny:

Chilean artist set fire to all evidence of student debt worth £297 million

source

He seriously took one for the team. God bless :*

a hero, holy shit

Source: allisonkilkenny

Chelsea Clinton has moved on from Rush Limbaugh — after the bombastic conservative radio host compared the 12-year-old first daughter to a dog in 1992.

Clinton recalled the “indubious honor” from Limbaugh but says she learned to develop “a thick skin as a survival tactic.”

“Maybe that’s an extreme example, but unless a lot has changed in middle school and high school since I was a student, I can promise you that every woman in this room has encountered something similar,” she told the National Conference for College Women Student Leaders Thursday at the University of Maryland.

Source: inothernews

portraitsofboston:

     “I live a very quiet life. I got married, got divorced and then my daughter was killed in a car accident. After that happened, I started writing a lot of poetry and making quilts for kids. I’ve made hundreds.”     “Is this your business?”     “No, nobody would buy my quilts. I give them away to battered women’s homes, shelters for displaced immigrants, and people seeking asylum from El Salvador and elsewhere. I don’t know exactly who gets them but those children come from bad lives and they need something to make them feel good—something warm and cozy.”     “Why exactly do you think you felt the need to do this after you lost your daughter?”     “It made me realize that I was no different than a mother in Guatemala where at the time there was a decimation of indigenous people or a mother in El Salvador or Argentina. In my loss, I was no different from any of those women. And South American women are very loving and warm and friendly. Somehow they were able to not become hateful. I also know that I am not a very good sewer, so my quilts are far from perfect. But kids don’t care about perfection. I always make them with animals and hearts: Kids love animals and hearts are for love. That’s all kids care about.”

portraitsofboston:

     “I live a very quiet life. I got married, got divorced and then my daughter was killed in a car accident. After that happened, I started writing a lot of poetry and making quilts for kids. I’ve made hundreds.”
     “Is this your business?”
     “No, nobody would buy my quilts. I give them away to battered women’s homes, shelters for displaced immigrants, and people seeking asylum from El Salvador and elsewhere. I don’t know exactly who gets them but those children come from bad lives and they need something to make them feel good—something warm and cozy.”
     “Why exactly do you think you felt the need to do this after you lost your daughter?”
     “It made me realize that I was no different than a mother in Guatemala where at the time there was a decimation of indigenous people or a mother in El Salvador or Argentina. In my loss, I was no different from any of those women. And South American women are very loving and warm and friendly. Somehow they were able to not become hateful. I also know that I am not a very good sewer, so my quilts are far from perfect. But kids don’t care about perfection. I always make them with animals and hearts: Kids love animals and hearts are for love. That’s all kids care about.”

Source: portraits-of-america

bryanthenerd:

I love her

Source: nataliedormier

So number one, Reading Rainbow was not cancelled because it was not effective. Reading Rainbow was the most used television resource in our nation’s classroom. In 2009, it was [cancelled] due to No Child Left Behind. That government policy made a choice between teaching the rudiments of reading and fostering a love of reading. So the idea that I am trying to somehow revive a failed endeavor is bullshit. That’s right. I said it. Bullshit.

Source: franfinethesecond

an-ime-goil:

loki-the-prince-of-sass:

as-seen-on-disney:

disneyaddictblr:

ice-and-metaphors:

sizvideos:

Marines singing Let it go - Video

OMG

SCREAMING

I JUST LAUGHED SO HARD THAT I SNORTED AND CHOKED

THIS IS THE CUTEST THING I CANT EVEN

LOL, WHEN SHE FLIPS DOWN HER HAIR AND THEY FREAK OUT AND HURRAH HER LOL

Source: sizvideos

afro-dominicano:

makomori:

some fave tweets from warsan shire

ultimate bae

Source: makomoriarchive

fagflow:

fagflow:

image

Source: kittiezandtittiez

science-junkie:

The intriguing science behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch
It’s a punch that has captivated our imagination for decades. From the distance of one-inch, Bruce Lee could break boards, knock opponents off their feet and look totally badass doing it. It’s one of the most famous — and fabled — blows in the world. Days ago, Popular Mechanics set out to solve the mystery behind it – and did.
Drawing upon both physical and neuro power, Lee’s devastating one-inch punch involved substantially more than arm strength. It was achieved through the fluid teamwork of every body part. It was his feet. It was hips and arms. It was even his brain. In several milliseconds, a spark of kinetic energy ignited in Lee’s feet and surged through his core to his limbs before its eventual release.
Read more

science-junkie:

The intriguing science behind Bruce Lee’s one-inch punch

It’s a punch that has captivated our imagination for decades. From the distance of one-inch, Bruce Lee could break boards, knock opponents off their feet and look totally badass doing it. It’s one of the most famous — and fabled — blows in the world. Days ago, Popular Mechanics set out to solve the mystery behind it – and did.

Drawing upon both physical and neuro power, Lee’s devastating one-inch punch involved substantially more than arm strength. It was achieved through the fluid teamwork of every body part. It was his feet. It was hips and arms. It was even his brain. In several milliseconds, a spark of kinetic energy ignited in Lee’s feet and surged through his core to his limbs before its eventual release.

Read more

Source: Washington Post

upworthy:

They Denied Her Humanity, So She Got Famous And Spoke Out. Loud.

nerdgerhl:

I feel like there are probably too many people just scrolling past this so let’s go through everything that’s going on here. 

1. With Roger’s voice actor standing off camera, Bob Hoskins acts into empty air and frantically sawing at his handcuff, continually looking up and down at different visual marks of various depths. Look at the slow pan up of his eyes in gif 4, and then the quick shift to his side. Think about how, on set, he was looking at nothing. 

2. Starting in gif 2, The box must be made to stop shaking, either by concealed crew member, mechanism, or Hoskins own dextrousness, as he is doing all of the things mentioned in point 1. 

3. In all gifs, Roger’s handcuff has to be made to move appropriately through a hidden mechanism. (If you watch the 4th gif closely you can see the split second where it is replaced by an animated facsimile of the actual handcuff, but just for barely a second.)

4. The crew voluntarily (we know this because it is now a common internal phrase at Disney for putting in extra work for small but significant reward) decided to make Roger bump the lamp and give the entire scene a constantly moving light source that had to be matched between the on set footage and Roger. This was for two reasons, A) Robert Zemeckis thought it would be funnier, and B) one of the key techniques the crew employed to make the audience instinctually accept that Toons coexisted with the live action environment was constant interaction with it. This is why, other than comedy, Roger is so dang clumsy. Instead of isolating Toons from real objects to make it easier for themselves, the production went out of its way to make Toons interact more with the live action set than even real actors necessarily would, in order to subtly, constantly remind the audience that they have real palpable presence. You can watch the whole scene here, just to see how few shots there are of Roger where he doesn’t interact with a real object. 

The crew and animators did all of this with hand drawn cell animation without computerized special effects. 1988, we were still five years out from Jurassic Park, the first movie to make the leap from fully physical creature effects to seamlessly integrating realistic computer generated images with live action footage. Roger’s shadows weren’t done with CGI. Hoskin’s sightlines were not digitally altered. Wires controlling the handcuff were not removed in post. 

Who fucking Framed Roger fucking Rabbit, folks. The greatest trick is when people don’t realize you’re tricking them at all. 

Source: teflonly

9to5upontheshelf:

Everyone please appreciate Amy Poehler more

Tagged: amy poehlerfierce lady

Source: daviddayluiz